Functional Neurology for Morton’s Neuroma

Are you suffering from Morton’s Neuroma and tired of living with the constant pain and discomfort it causes? Are you tired of relying on medication and invasive procedures to manage your symptoms? Then it’s time for you to try Functional Neurology for Morton’s Neuroma.

Functional neurology is a holistic approach to healing the nervous system, and it can be used to address the root cause of Morton’s Neuroma rather than simply treating the symptoms. By identifying and addressing imbalances in the nervous system, functional neurology practitioners can help to reduce inflammation and pain, improve the function of the affected nerve, and prevent the condition from becoming chronic.

One of the main benefits of Functional Neurology for Morton’s Neuroma is that it is non-invasive and drug-free. This means that you can avoid the risks and side effects associated with invasive procedures and medication. Functional neurology also aims to restore the normal function of the body, as well as improve overall health and well-being, something that traditional treatment often doesn’t cover.

Functional neurology practitioners also work closely with other healthcare providers, such as podiatrists, to provide a comprehensive and coordinated care plan. This ensures that you receive the best possible treatment for your condition and that all aspects of your health and well-being are taken into account.

Don’t let Morton’s Neuroma control your life any longer. It’s time for you to take control and try functional neurology for your condition. Functional Neurology for Morton’s Neuroma has helped many patients just like you to reduce pain, improve function, and take back control of their lives. Don’t hesitate to make an appointment with a functional neurology practitioner today to see if this treatment option is right for you.

What is Morton’s Neuroma?

Morton’s Neuroma, also known as interdigital neuroma, is a condition that affects the ball of the foot, specifically the area between the third and fourth toes. It is caused by the thickening of the tissue, called a fibroma, around one of the nerves leading to the toes. This thickening of the tissue can compress the nerve and cause a sharp, burning pain in the ball of the foot, as well as stinging, burning, or numbness in the affected toes. The condition may also feel as if you are standing on a pebble in your shoe or on a fold in your sock.

High-heeled and tight shoes, especially those with a narrow toe box, have been identified as a major risk factor for the development of Morton’s Neuroma. The constant pressure and friction on the toes can irritate the nerve and cause inflammation, leading to the formation of a fibroma. Wearing shoes that are too tight can also cause hammertoes, bunions, and other conditions that can increase the risk of developing Morton’s Neuroma.

The exact cause of Morton’s Neuroma is not well understood, but several risk factors have been identified. High-heeled shoes are known to put pressure on the metatarsal bones and can contribute to the development of the condition. People who have foot deformities, such as bunions or hammertoes, are also at a higher risk of developing Morton’s Neuroma. Athletes, particularly those who participate in high-impact sports, may also be at an increased risk of developing the condition due to the repetitive stress placed on the metatarsal bones.

The symptoms of Morton’s Neuroma include pain and tenderness in the ball of the foot, burning sensation or numbness in the toes, and sharp or shooting pain that may radiate to the toes. The pain is often worse when standing or walking and may improve with rest. Swelling or redness in the area may also be present.

Diagnosis of Morton’s Neuroma is usually made based on the patient’s symptoms and a physical examination. A doctor may also order imaging tests, such as an X-ray or MRI, to rule out other conditions that may cause similar symptoms, such as a stress fracture or bone tumor.

Treatment for Morton’s Neuroma is typically conservative and focuses on reducing pain and inflammation. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help to reduce pain and inflammation, and physical therapy may also be recommended to help stretch and strengthen the foot and ankle muscles. Wearing shoes with a low heel and a wide toe box can help to redistribute the pressure on the metatarsal bones and alleviate pain. Custom-made orthotics or inserts may also be prescribed to help redistribute weight and alleviate pain.

For more severe cases, procedures such as corticosteroid injections, cryotherapy, extracorporeal shockwave therapy or even surgery, may be considered to alleviate pain and inflammation.

It’s important to note that self-care measures such as rest and avoiding high-impact activities may help alleviate symptoms, but will not cure the condition. Always consult with a healthcare provider for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan that is best for you.

What is Functional Neurology?

Functional Neurology is a holistic approach to healthcare that aims to address the underlying causes of neurological conditions, rather than just treating symptoms. This field of medicine is based on the understanding that the brain and nervous system control and coordinate all functions of the body. Therefore, by identifying and addressing any dysfunction in the nervous system, it is possible to improve overall health and function.

Functional Neurology practitioners utilize a wide range of techniques to assess and treat patients, including functional movement assessments, gait analysis, balance testing, cognitive and memory assessments, and even eye movement examinations. These tests are used to identify any imbalances or dysfunction in the nervous system and to create a personalized treatment plan for each patient. Here are a few ways that functional neurology practitioners may use to treat nerve damage:

  • Gait analysis: By analyzing a patient’s gait and the way they walk, functional neurology practitioners can identify any imbalances in the nervous system that may be contributing to the nerve damage. Gait analysis can also be used to track a patient’s progress over time.
  • Balance training: Training exercises that improve balance can help to improve the function of damaged nerves by strengthening neural pathways and reducing inflammation.
  • Manual therapy: Practitioners of functional neurology may use manual therapy techniques such as joint mobilization, myofascial release, and cranial sacral therapy to help reduce pain and inflammation, and improve nerve function.
  • Neuromodulation techniques: techniques like Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, Vagus Nerve stimulation, and others that can be used to target specific areas of the brain or spinal cord to improve nerve function.
  • Specific exercises and rehabilitation: A functional neurologist may design a specific exercise program to help the patient to improve function of specific nerve, by targeting areas that are not working properly.
  • Nutritional support and environmental modification: A practitioner may recommend dietary changes and environmental adjustments such as changes in ergonomics, lighting, and electromagnetic fields to support healing and reduce inflammation in the nervous syste

Functional Neurology for Morton’s Neuroma

Functional Neurology is a holistic approach to healthcare that aims to address the underlying causes of conditions, rather than just treating symptoms. When it comes to treating Morton’s Neuroma, Functional Neurology practitioners may use a combination of different techniques to address the underlying causes of the condition and alleviate pain. This includes techniques such as proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, neuro-orthopedic rehabilitation, gait analysis, vestibular rehabilitation, dry needling, and recommendations for dietary and lifestyle changes, to alleviate pain, improve function and prevent the condition from worsening. It’s important to work with a functional neurologist to develop a customized treatment plan that is tailored to your specific needs.

One technique that may be used in Functional Neurology for Morton’s Neuroma is called “proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation” (PNF) which is a form of stretching that aims to re-educate the muscle’s ability to contract and relax. This may be helpful for individuals with Morton’s Neuroma as it can help to improve the flexibility and strength of the foot and ankle muscles.

Another technique that may be used is called “neuro-orthopedic rehabilitation” which is a form of physical therapy aiming to improve the body’s coordination and balance. This may be beneficial for individuals with Morton’s Neuroma as it can help to improve the stability and alignment of the foot and ankle, which can help to alleviate pain and reduce the risk of further injury.

Functional Neurology practitioners may also incorporate techniques such as gait analysis, to evaluate the way the patient walks and identify any abnormalities or asymmetries that may be contributing to the condition.

Another technique that may be used in Functional Neurology for Morton’s Neuroma is called “vestibular rehabilitation.” This is a form of therapy that aims to improve the function of the inner ear, which is responsible for maintaining balance and coordination. This type of therapy may be beneficial for individuals with Morton’s Neuroma as it can help to improve the stability and alignment of the foot and ankle, which can help to alleviate pain.

Functional Neurology practitioners may also use techniques such as “dry needling” which is a form of therapy that involves the insertion of small needles into specific points in the body, to help release muscle tension, increase blood flow, and reduce inflammation. This type of therapy may be beneficial for individuals with Morton’s Neuroma as it can help to alleviate pain and improve the function of the foot and ankle muscles.

Additionally, Functional Neurology practitioners may recommend dietary and lifestyle changes, such as reducing inflammation in the body through eating an anti-inflammatory diet and supplementations, to address the underlying causes of Morton’s Neuroma. This can help to alleviate symptoms and prevent the condition from worsening.